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Updated July 14: An Adventure To Cappy’s Craft Wine And Spirits

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Join me as I play recreational Cincinnati cyclist and finally try out the Loveland Bike Trail. There’s one major difference however: I didn’t drive a car, park it, then start my ride. I rode from my house. Yes, take that. I believe most of the time a bike ride should not involve gasoline and an internal combustion engine.

Cappy’s Craft Wine And Spirits is a place I’ve heard of a few times and finally had brought into the forefront of my consciousness by the web presence known as Hoperatives here in the Cincinnati area. It clicked that this was a place not far at all off the Loveland Trail that fills growlers and carried a lot of craft beer. Sounds like an adventure to me.

Allow me to take a moment to address something: One day as I was at Rivertown Brewing recently, there was a guy I’d just met talking about cycling with me and the Loveland Bike Trail came up. Suddenly from my other side came a loud, adamant, somewhat obnoxious voice proclaiming that it’s not the Loveland Bike Trail. It’s the Loveland Multi-Use Trail! The man, a cyclist, insisted that walkers did not want him blazing along the trail at 30 miles per hour or something like that. You know what? He has a point, albeit a point I already understood. It is indeed a multi-use trail and cyclists should yield and give as wide a berth as possible to those on foot. His point I do think bears repeating here, as I believe most folks call it the Loveland Bike Trail. Many cyclists – almost exclusively those clad in bright Lycra and atop expensive road bikes – ride fast, disrespectfully and unsafely to others on trails such as this.

I feel bad leveling a dig at serious and somewhat serious roadies, or even wannabe lookalikes. I love and promote all forms of cycling. The more people in bikes the better! People, though, need to be respectful and considerate of others. I love to ride fast, and would like to think I’m pretty good at it. I, however, almost always slow down, and put as much space as is reasonable between me and slower riders, and those on foot.

Something else very much needs addressing here: Pedestrians have their own serious burden of responsibility in sharing paths and other ways of travel. So many people traveling on foot (cyclists too) are oblivious to the world around them, but particularly anything and anyone behind them. Walkers, please, if you’re going to spread out and take up most or all of the way of passage (as is apparently human nature) please put in some effort toward periodically checking behind you or at least listening!! Almost every time I come up behind people walking, whether I am running or whether I am cycling, my attempts to get their attention with anything less than a loud, rude holler, fail. Pay attention, or don’t spread out and block the way, people! This should be basic.

Now, back to beer adventuring.

Pretty nice selection for what feels and looks like a traditional small town.

Pretty nice selection for what feels and looks like a traditional small town.

Cappy’s is located in Loveland, in case I haven’t mentioned it. The ride from my house, I think, was about 25 miles one way. This place is part of the trend – one that amazes me – of offering beer on tap at stores. There is a grocery store in Cincinnati that fills growlers, and this is one of two convenience stores that I know of in the area that also do. Cappy’s has a very nice selection of bottled beers as well of course. It’s a place to find nice wine too, though I didn’t take the time to check that out on this maiden voyage. I refer you to my post on Chuck’s on 85th, known now as Chuck’s Hop Shop for a writeup of a place that is doing the same thing in Seattle. The main difference, aside from the fact that Chuck’s has a lot more on tap, and more in bottles, is that Chuck’s is allowed to serve glasses of beer to be consumed onsite. Cappy’s currently is limited to offering four tiny samples for $1. The guy who helped me this day at Cappy’s, though, told me that this coming fall they would become allowed to pour beer for consumption on premise. Two pints he thought would be the limit. Neat! Guess it must be up to Loveland lawmakers, as the Whole Foods in Cincinnati makes no mention of a pint limit.

Nice stuff.

Nice stuff.

Getting to Cappy’s from my location in Hyde Park was not bad. Basically you ride the same route you use to get to Fifty West Brewing, but you proceed a fairly short distance past it, crossing the intersection at Newtown Rd. and then find the beginning of the trail on your right.

I will provide a map next, and further describe the ride and the growler filling experience at Cappy’s.

July 12 update follows:

Here’s the map:

http://goo.gl/maps/IkeRN

The ride from Hyde Park to Cappy’s brought back memories of Seattle. How? Think Burke Gilman Trail. From my home on Bainbridge Island, WA I’d ride to the ferry, take the boat, then sometimes ride a handful of miles to where I could pick up the Burke Gilman then head off to my destination. Here, I rode a handful of miles where I could pick up the Loveland Trail and head to my destination. Of course a major difference is that there are far fewer useful places the Loveland Trail can take you compared to its Seattle counterpart.

I took Erie to the east, followed it and enjoyed the bike lanes that are present on parts of it, and at Murray Rd., turned right. See, there is another short separated multi-use path to enjoy here that takes you into Mariemont. On this trip I had a nice experience talking to a fellow cyclist on the Murray Trail. An older gentleman in riding gear pulled up alongside me and asked where I was headed. Informed that we had moved here last fall from Seattle, he shared some information about the Loveland Trail with me that I already knew. A nice experience that you just cannot get driving a car. Human connection.

The Murray Trail ends and leaves you to ride on a residential street with, oddly, another residential street running parallel to it. Take this to the intersection with Plainville Rd., a stop sign intersection where you cut diagonally across and proceed on Madisonville Rd. which curves right and takes you down to the heart of Mariemont’s business/entertainment district. Cross the stop light intersection, turning left onto Wooster Pike/50.

From there you ride on the roadway with no bike lane or appreciable shoulder through the eastern part of Mariemont. There is a great downhill stretch before you pass the big grocery store. Not too long after that you pass Fifty West Brewing which is on the left. Proceed past the intersection with Newtown Rd. and shortly after that find the entrance to the Loveland Trail on your right.

Before long you pass a park. This is always great, as you can possibly fill a water bottle and use the restroom unless these facilities are closed for the winter (hate that!).

The rest of the ride is pretty self-explanatory. There are some places where you deal with intersections with roads. At least a couple of them are pretty treacherous.

When you get into Loveland, get off the trail and go left on Loveland Ave. (I recommend staying on the near side of the road, dismounting and walking/running on the sidewalk) It’s not far to where you cross an intersection then see Cappy’s on the left.

Cappy’s, frankly, doesn’t look very nice on the outside. Well, neither does it on the inside. This is pretty much on par with Seattle’s Super Deli Mart and Chuck’s Hop Shop however. It’s a quickie mart that has beer on tap.

Notice I didn’t say it pours beer. Not until this fall according to the guy who helped me.

On this visit to Cappy’s I filled two growlers – one with the local Mt. Carmel Snapshot Series Imperial IPA (very good) and the other with Ballast Point Sculpin IPA. I’ll quickly mention Mt. Carmel Brewing since I probably won’t document an adventure to that brewery. See, it’s not possible as far as I can tell to ride a bike there. One day I had to drive to Eastgate Mall and I made the trip more worthwhile by finally visiting Mt. Carmel. I was quite impressed. The tasting room space is very nice, the service is friendly and the beer is good. You’re inside an old house and can proceed back into other areas of the house that are very tastefully appointed. Outside there is a sitting area and a pond complete with two fake ducks and sometimes two real ones. Any time I have to drive out that way I’ll be stopping in (if they’re open).

Back to Cappy’s. Well, more on Cappy’s next!

July 14 update follows:

Pull your bike up to Cappy’s and, of course, find no bike parking. I locked up to something out front and hoped no locals would complain. Yes I was struck by how, oh how to I phrase it, towny this place appears. I had heard good things about it online and was impressed that Cappy’s is smart enough to maintain an active web presence, providing Twitter updates showing their current tap lineup. What do I expect, I guess. It’s a convenience store in a relatively small town in the Midwest. Even the two quickie marts in Seattle that pour beer are frankly pretty crummy in appearance, and only one of them has a bike rack out front. The standard macro beers occupy a surprising share of Cappy’s coolers and floor space.

On to the good: Cappy’s does have a nice selection of both bottles and draft beer. If I recall, they have as a standard offering Bell’s Two Hearted Ale for a decent price per growler fill. The prices on the rest of their fills are typical – mostly somewhat overpriced for this bargain hunter.

On this visit there was a mixup. The cordial, genuine young man helping me filled one of my growlers with the wrong beer. This wound up being a slightly bigger issue than I would expect. He couldn’t see his way to pouring the beer into another vessel where it could serve another purpose. Instead he offered, to my dismay, to swap out my growler for a new one. I got the feeling he didn’t fully understand the basic tenet of growlership that states that the growler is the property of the customer. This was my growler from Seattle’s Peddler Brewing Company – a bicycle-themed brewery that I’ve written about. There was no way I was letting him keep it, and I was offended that he seemed to think he had the right to take it. I don’t want to be hard on the guy. He was nice and in the end came up with a solution that was agreeable.

An interesting thing about Cappy’s: They offer 1/2 size growlers pre-filled with beer that comes out of their lines just prior to their cleaning the lines. I really appreciate their finding a use for this beer that otherwise would go wasted. It’s sold at a decent discount, however, this discount is wiped out by the fact that you must purchase the new 1/2 size growler glassware at the same time. I wish they would provide this offer while allowing you to exchange a 1/2 size growler of your own, thus relieving you of purchasing the new glassware each time.

The selection of bottled beer at Cappy’s is fairly impressive. I have some pics of the bottled beers that I may share at a future date, but my wife and I have switched phones temporarily. You get the idea regarding Cappys though. It’s a solid place that I’m glad to have available. I look forward to their beginning to offer beer for consumption on premise. I wonder if they will install a seating area, and how far this will be taken. I don’t personally need seating, as wandering around a bottle shop while sipping a beer is a favorite activity.

Well that’s Cappy’s, folks – at least from my unique perspective. The ride home is just a reversal of the outgoing trip and of course can feel sort of long. I stopped in Fifty West on the way back and found it overrun with what I found out to be a load of tour bus revelers. Don’t get me started on the whole craft beer tour van/bus thing taking root in Cincinnati.

Thanks for joining me on this adventure. Look for an adventure that may take place in the immediate future that will see me on the Loveland Trail again and blazing all the way to Morrow, OH for a visit to Cellar Dweller Brewing!

Cheers, and keep spinning those spokes!

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An Adventure to Habits Cafe. On Foot!

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Join me as I stroll – not roll – down to Habits Cafe in Oakley. As I pointed out in my previous post, I have an arm that I had to have operated on. It kept me off my bike for weeks, and kept me from typing with two hands for a while as well.

Interesting graffiti in the bathroom.

Interesting graffiti in Habit’s bathroom.

During that time, I wasn’t going to let it keep me down, or inside the house! Living in the Pleasant Ridge neighborhood of Cincinnati, options are few in terms of decent places to get a pint. MadTree is the obvious exception.

I’ve run down to Keystone Hyde Park, and its neighbor, Dutch’s. That run is three miles straight down Ridge/Marburg. Nothing exciting to report about that journey, though it’s a perfectly viable one especially with two wheel capability. The run is a bit annoyingly long, especially given the largely inhospitable conditions for pedestrians much of the way. Yes there are sidewalks most of the way, but it’s not a nice route. It becomes nicer as you get toward Hyde Park. I’m not being a snob here. In the ridiculousness that is Ridge Rd., or Marburg through most of Oakley, sidewalks are, in places, often blocked with trash like discarded mattresses, weeds and you name it – or the sidewalks are non-existant. A person out walking or jogging for pleasure or exercise is a rarity. Man, I can’t wait to get out of Pleasant Ridge.

More interesting graffiti.

More interesting graffiti.

One of the things my disability to ride a bike brought me was a bit of creativity in plotting an active beer outing.

The two Pleasant Ridge options, Gaslight Cafe, Molly Malone’s suck quite frankly. The service I’ve received there on my few visits has been abysmal. I know many people like those places, but crappy service, or lack of service all together (being ignored) is not my thing.

My mind turned to the question of where can I get on foot from here that’s viable? I give you this adventure’s route:

http://goo.gl/maps/QqOGE

For detailed information on what it takes to traverse Ridge Rd., see my post on Moerlein Brewery Taproom. The map of today’s adventure shows the same route down through there, but without the detail pins found in the map to Moerlein.

They have craft beer! Cutting edge! I almost walked home and got my car!

I passed this on my way there. A common phenomenon in these parts: a drive thru liquor joint. They have craft beer! Cutting edge! I almost walked home and got my car!

You get to leave lovely Ridge Rd. on the street where Steak & Shake is found. Cross the often busy street, then cut through parking lots. Pass in front of Target, then in back of Meier. Proceed across the movie theater parking lot. See the grass/dirt field ahead. Enter it, heading toward the chain link fence.

On my first tryout of this adventure that I had planned using Google Maps, I came very close to giving up and using the roadway instead of cutting through across the railroad tracks. I saw the fence, and didn’t see any openings in it, though I felt there had to be at least one. I knew for sure I wasn’t the first person who wanted to cut through here. At the last second, I saw a grocery cart in the corner of the fence to the right. Clearly this was here to help someone climb over the fence. Was I going to climb the barbed wire-topped fence with my arm in a sling? Of course not. But I moved toward the fence corner where the cart was located. I saw nothing viable. Turning back in defeat, my eyes scanned the fence one more time. That’s when I saw it. Behind the giant mound of dirt I assume was piled there during the excavation process for the building of the movie theater, I saw an opening in the fence! Eureka!

The interesting thing about this opening in the fence is that it appears a boulder rolled down the back of the hill and busted through the fence. It’s laying there on top of the knocked-down portion of the fence. Could it be that this opening in the fence, an opening which provides a critical link for walkers between Pleasant Ridge and Oakley was brought about by mere chance? Thought-provoking.

I crossed through with jubilance, then I crossed the railroad tracks. Right in front of me awaited a nice street with sidewalks. I was as good as there. A stroll through a neighborhood brought me to a sidewalk running along side Habits Cafe!

Habits is located in the heart of Oakley Square. It seems to have a restaurant side and a bar side, though seating for diners is throughout. The place is surprisingly lowbrow at the bar for what seems to also be a nice restaurant. Macro piss beer flows along side a nice little selection of regional and American crafts.

Every time I’ve visited, I’ve gotten decent-to-good service. They have almost always plopped a beer menu down in front of me, which I appreciate obviously. Their pricing on beer is surprisingly reasonable.

That’s about all I have to say about Habits.

I was quite psyched to find success on my snowy pedestrian adventure out of Pleasant Ridge and right into the back door of Oakley. Thankfully, I didn’t slip and fall on my arm at any point, which would have been pretty terrible.

Thanks for joining me on this unique outing. It really was an adventure for me with its uncertainty, discovery and success. It’s just what I needed at the time, and will hopefully come in handy some day for at least one of you readers.

I look forward to your company on my next adventure which will be awesomely on bicycle!

Cheers, and keep spinning those spokes!

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